The Effect of Sleep Quality on Peptic-Ulcer Relapse in Older Adults

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Poor sleep quality and peptic ulcer disease (PUD, a condition when sores known as ulcers develop on the lining of your stomach or in the first part of your small intestine) are both major public health problems that affect the physical and psychological wellbeing of older adults.

Poor sleep quality can be caused by age-related increases in chronic health conditions, medication use, sleep behavior changes, and other issues. It affects around one-third of all older adults. Peptic ulcers are common among older adults, too. They often result from the presence of a specific bacteria, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), in our gut. Thanks to the development of treatments for H. pylori infections, however, the rate of recurrent peptic ulcers (ulcers that consistently come back after treatment) has dropped dramatically. Few people who experience a recurrence of ulcers, for example, are infected with H. pylori.

However, that still doesn’t explain why some people experience recurrence.

Recently, a team of researchers designed a study to test their hypothesis that other factors besides the bacteria could cause peptic ulcer recurrence—and that poor sleep may be among them. They published their results in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Continue reading

How much sleep do older adults need?

setters

Belinda Setters, MD, MS, AGSF, FACP
Director, Mobile ACE & Transitional Care Programs
Associate Clinical Professor
Geriatric Medicine & Palliative Care
Robley Rex VA Medical Center

When most of us talk about sleep needs, we usually think about children. We know children need a certain amount of sleep to stay active and healthy and to grow into adulthood. Children have a bedtime and parents (and grandparents!) work hard to ensure they are in bed on time and get the sleep they need every night. But most of us don’t think about how much sleep we get or need as we grow older. And yet, sleep is just as critical to our health as we age.

As we age, our brains may tell us to go to sleep earlier. This is likely why so many folks fall asleep right after the evening news or dinner. Despite this, most older adults don’t always get a full 8 hours of sleep or awaken feeling refreshed. This may be because our brains don’t cycle through deep sleep as well or as much as they did when we were younger. Restless legs, arthritis, and breathing disorders can also keep us awake. And then there is the bladder. Older adults with prostate or bladder disorders often get up at night to use the bathroom. This disrupts sleep as well. Our bodies adapt as we age to adjust to these changes and as a result our sleep patterns adapt as well.

But do we really need 8 hours of sleep as we get older? Does napping make up for this lack of sleep at night? Is it possible to sleep too much?

The National Sleep Foundation says yes—to all of those questions. In an expert panel convened by the Foundation, sleep experts and other specialists reviewed extensive research on sleep needs by age groups, including older adults. Their February 2015 report reflects the most up-to-date recommendations on sleep needs. The panel found that while sleep patterns change with aging, adults 65-years-old and older still need between 7-8 hours of sleep nightly, and ideally over a continuous period of time.

The panel further determined that—while this range is ideal for older adults—some people may need slightly less or more sleep to meet their individual needs. Some people may have a sleep pattern that results in feeling fully refreshed with only 6 hours of sleep, for example.  Meanwhile other people may need an extra hour or so, for a total of 9 hours nightly. To account for these variations, the panel noted a range just outside the recommended hours most folks need. This can be seen in the diagram released with the report below. Continue reading