Many Older Adults Face New Disabilities After Hospital Stays for Serious Illnesses

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Older adults often face new disabilities after a hospital stay for a serious illness. Among the problems they may need to adjust to are difficulties with bathing and dressing, shopping and preparing meals, and getting around inside and outside the home. These new disabilities can lead to being hospitalized again, being placed in a nursing home, and more permanent declines in well-being. The longer a serious disability lasts, the worse it can be for an older adult.

To learn more about this issue, a research team studied information about a particular group of people. They looked at individuals who were hospitalized for a medical issue but did not require critical care. The study was based on data from the Precipitating Events Project (PEP), an ongoing study of 754 people, aged 70 or older, who lived at home at the beginning of the study. At that time, the participants were not disabled and did not need assistance in four basic activities: bathing, dressing, walking inside the house, and getting out of a chair. The researchers published their study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Continue reading

Frailty Can Affect How Well Older Adults Fare Following Emergency Surgery

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Frailty is the medical term for becoming weaker or experiencing lower levels of activity/energy.  Becoming frail as we age increases our risk for poor health, falls, disability, and other serious concerns. This can be especially true for older people facing surgery, up to half of whom are classified as frail.

Studies show that frail people may have a higher risk of complications, longer hospital stays, and a higher risk for death within 30 days of their surgery. This is a special concern when frail older adults face emergency surgery for abdominal conditions such as bleeding ulcers and bowel perforations (the medical term for developing a hole in the wall of your intestines). This is because there is no time to help someone facing emergency surgery get stronger before their procedure.

Right now, experts have information on how well frail people do within 30 days of surgery. However, they don’t yet know how well frail older adults do 30 days later and beyond. This information is important so that healthcare providers can inform patients about risks and help them set expectations for recovery after surgery.

A new study in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society sought to gain more information about how frailty affects older adults in the months after surgery. The research team wanted to test their theory that these people would have a higher risk for death a year after surgery, have higher rates of being sent to long-term care facilities rather than to their homes, and have poorer health one year after surgery. Continue reading

Can Home-Based Physical Therapy Benefit Older Adults with Dementia?

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Dementia is the leading cause of disability for more than 5 million people aged 65 and older in this country. By 2050, that number is predicted to quadruple. Dementia can cause memory, language and decision-making problems, mood changes, increased irritability, depression, and anxiety.

Dementia also can cause poor coordination as well as balance problems and falls. These difficulties can affect quality of life, reduce caregiver well-being, and increase healthcare costs.

Researchers designed a study to learn more about whether physical therapy (PT) rehabilitation services could improve dementia-associated declines. They published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The researchers noted that we understand that physical activity and exercise programs provided by physical therapists can improve balance and reduce fall risk. However, we don’t know whether providing PT in the home could benefit people with dementia. The researchers wanted to learn whether home health PT could help older adults with dementia improve their ability to perform daily functions. These functions include activities like grooming, dressing, bathing, being able to get to and from the toilet (and being able to clean yourself properly after using the bathroom), getting from bed to a chair, walking, eating, being able to plan and prepare light meals, and being able to use the telephone. The researchers also wanted to learn what amount of home-based PT services resulted in the most improvement with these essential tasks. Continue reading