Should Diabetes Treatment Lessen for Older Adults Approaching the End of Life?

Print

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

También disponible en español – Ver abajo.

One in four people aged 65 or older has diabetes. The disease is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States and a major contributor to heart disease. Experts have recommended that the best way to slow the progression of diabetes—and help prevent its many complications—is to maintain strict control of blood sugar levels. For healthy younger people, this means keeping the target blood sugar level (known as A1c or HbA1c) lower than 6.5 percent to 7.0 percent.

For older adults who have a limited life expectancy or who have advanced dementia, however, maintaining that target blood sugar level may cause more harm than good. For example, these older adults may not live long enough to experience potential benefits. What’s more, maintaining these strict blood sugar levels can raise the risk of potentially harmful events such as low blood sugar (also known as hypoglycemia). This can cause falls or loss of consciousness.

For these reasons, many guidelines now suggest targeting higher HbA1c targets—such as between 8.0 percent and 9.0 percent—for older adults who have multiple chronic conditions or limited life expectancy, or who live in nursing homes.

There is not much existing research to guide health care practitioners as to what the appropriate levels of diabetes medications are for this group of older adults. There is also little information about the effects for these individuals of taking fewer or lower dose of diabetes medications.

Experts suspect that lessening diabetes treatment in these older adults has the potential to prevent unnecessary hospitalizations due to lowering the risk for harmful drug events and increasing the patients’ comfort.

In order to investigate the issue, a team of researchers conducted a study—one of the first national studies to examine potential overtreatment and deintensification of diabetes management in nursing home residents with limited life expectancy or dementia. The researchers chose nursing home residents to study because admission to a nursing home could give healthcare practitioners a chance to learn more about patient goals and preferences and to review and adjust medications accordingly. The researchers published their results in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The researchers examined information from Veterans Affairs nursing homes from 2009 to 2015. Their goal was to learn more about older adults with diabetes, particularly those nearing the end of their life or who have dementia. The researchers investigated whether these older adults were overtreated for diabetes, whether they had their diabetes medication regimens lessened, and what effects might result from lowered doses, types and/or different kinds of medication.

The researchers wanted to learn specifically how often diabetes treatments were lessened. Among the nursing home residents identified as potentially overtreated, the researchers examined how much their diabetes treatment regimens were lessened during the 90 days of follow-up.

The researchers did not consider insulin dose changes, because insulin doses may be influenced by factors such as eating habits.

The researchers said they observed potential overtreatment of diabetes in almost 44 percent of nursing home admissions for veterans with diabetes and veterans who had limited life expectancy or dementia. Potentially overtreated residents were about 78 years old and were nearly all male and non-Hispanic white. Two-thirds of the residents had been admitted to nursing homes from hospitals. A total of 29 percent had advanced dementia, almost 14 percent were classified with end-of-life status, and 79 percent had a moderately high risk of dying within six months. Many were physically dependent and had heart disease and/or potential diabetes-related complications. In addition, about 9 percent of overtreated residents had a serious low blood sugar episode in the year prior, emphasizing the need for deintensification.

Nearly half of residents received two or more diabetes medications, and those with higher HbA1c values of between 6.5 percent to 7.5 percent received more diabetes medications than those with lower HbA1c.

The researchers concluded that many veteran nursing home residents with limited life expectancy or dementia may be overtreated for their diabetes at the time of admission. The researchers suggested that future studies examine the impact of deintensification on health outcomes and adverse events to better understand the risks and benefits of diabetes management strategies in this group of older adults.

This summary is from “Deintensification of Diabetes Medications among Veterans at the End of Life in VA Nursing Homes.” It appears online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. The study authors are Joshua D. Niznik, PharmD, PhD; Jacob N. Hunnicutt, PhD; Xinhua Zhao, PhD; Maria K. Mor, PhD; Florentina Sileanu, MS; Sherrie L. Aspinall, PharmD, MSc; Sydney P. Springer, PharmD, MS; Mary J. Ersek, PhD, RN; Walid F. Gellad, MD, MPH; Loren J. Schleiden, MS; Joseph T. Hanlon, PharmD, MS; Joshua M. Thorpe, PhD, MPH; and Carolyn T. Thorpe, PhD, MPH.

 

¿Debería reducirse el tratamiento de la diabetes para los adultos mayores que se acercan al final de la vida?

Una de cada cuatro personas de 65 años o más tiene diabetes. Esta enfermedad es la séptima causa principal de muerte en los Estados Unidos y un importante contribuyente a la enfermedad cardíaca. Los expertos han recomendado que la mejor manera de reducir la progresión de la diabetes—y ayudar a prevenir las complicaciones—es mantener un control estricto de los niveles de azúcar en la sangre. Para las personas más jóvenes y saludables, esto significa mantener el
nivel objetivo de azúcar en la sangre (conocido como A1c o HbA1c) por debajo del 6.5% al 7.0%.

Sin embargo, para los adultos mayores que tienen una esperanza de vida limitada o que tienen demencia avanzada, mantener ese nivel objetivo de azúcar en la sangre puede causar más daño que bien. Por ejemplo, estos adultos mayores podrían morir antes de recibir los beneficios potenciales. Además, mantener estos niveles estrictos de azúcar en la sangre puede aumentar el riesgo de eventos potencialmente dañinos, como un nivel bajo de azúcar en la sangre (también conocido como hipoglucemia). Esto puede causar caídas o pérdida de conciencia.

Por estas razones, muchas pautas ahora sugieren apuntar un objetivo más alto para el HbA1c —como entre 8.0 % y 9.0 %— para adultos mayores que tienen múltiples enfermedades crónicas o una esperanza de vida limitada, o que viven en hogares de ancianos.

No hay mucha investigación existente para guiar a los profesionales de la salud sobre cuáles son los niveles apropiados de medicamentos para la diabetes para este grupo de adultos mayores. También hay poca información sobre los efectos para estas personas si toman menos medicamentos o una dosis menor para la diabetes.

Los expertos sospechan que reducir el tratamiento de la diabetes en estos adultos mayores tiene el potencial de prevenir hospitalizaciones innecesarias debido a que reducir el riesgo dañino de los medicamentos y mejorar la comodidad de los pacientes.

Para investigar el problema, un equipo de investigadores dirigieron un estudio—uno de los primeros estudios nacionales para examinar el posible sobretratamiento y la desintensificación del tratamiento de la diabetes en residentes de hogares de ancianos con una esperanza de vida limitada o con demencia. Los investigadores eligieron a los residentes de hogares de ancianos para estudiar porque la admisión a un hogar de ancianos podría darles la oportunidad, a los profesionales de la salud, de aprender más sobre los objetivos y preferencias de los pacientes y de revisar y ajustar los medicamentos en consecuencia. Los investigadores publicaron sus resultados en la revista llamada Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Los investigadores examinaron la información de los hogares de ancianos de Asuntos de Veteranos del año 2009 a 2015. Su objetivo era aprender más sobre los adultos mayores con diabetes, particularmente aquellos que se acercan al final de su vida o que tienen demencia. Los investigadores investigaron si estos adultos mayores fueron tratados en exceso por diabetes, si habían reducido sus regímenes de medicamentos para la diabetes y qué efectos podrían resultar de una dosis baja, tipos de medicamento o diferentes medicamentos.

Los investigadores querían saber específicamente con qué frecuencia se redujeron los tratamientos para la diabetes. Entre los residentes de hogares de ancianos identificados como potencialmente sobretratados, los investigadores examinaron cuánto redujeron sus regímenes de tratamiento de la diabetes durante los 90 días de seguimiento.

Los investigadores no consideraron los cambios en la dosis de insulina, porque las dosis de insulina pueden estar influenciadas por factores como los hábitos alimenticios.

Los investigadores dijeron que observaron un posible sobretratamiento de la diabetes en casi el 44 % de los ingresos a hogares de ancianos para veteranos con diabetes y veteranos que tenían una esperanza de vida limitada o demencia. Los residentes potencialmente sobretratados tenían casi 78 años, hombres, y blancos (no eran Latinos). Dos tercios de los residentes habían ingresado en hogares de ancianos desde hospitales. Un total del 29% tenían demencia avanzada, casi el 14% estaban clasificado con el estado final de la vida y el 79% tenían un riesgo moderadamente alto de morir en seis meses. Muchos eran físicamente dependientes y tenían enfermedades cardíacas y / o posibles complicaciones relacionadas con la diabetes. Además, aproximadamente el 9% de los residentes sobretratados tuvieron un episodio grave de bajo nivel de azúcar en la sangre en el año anterior, lo que enfatiza la necesidad de la desintensificación.

Casi la mitad de los residentes recibieron dos o más medicamentos para la diabetes, y aquellos con niveles más altos de HbA1c de entre 6.5% y 7.5% recibieron más medicamentos para la diabetes que aquellos con niveles más bajos de HbA1c.

Los investigadores concluyeron que muchos residentes veteranos de hogares de ancianos con esperanza de vida limitada o demencia pueden recibir un tratamiento excesivo por su diabetes al momento de la admisión. Los investigadores sugirieron que los estudios futuros examinen el impacto de la desintensificación en los resultados de salud y los eventos adversos para comprender mejor los riesgos y beneficios de las estrategias de manejo de la diabetes en este grupo de adultos mayores.

Casi la mitad de los residentes recibieron dos o más medicamentos para la diabetes, y aquellos con nivels de HbA1c más alto, entre 6.5% y 7.5%, recibieron más medicamentos para la diabetes que aquellos con niveles más bajos de HbA1c.

Este resumen es de la revista “Desintensificación de medicamentos para la diabetes entre veteranos al final de la vida en hogares del VA para ancianos.” Aparece en línea antes de la impresión en el Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Los autores del estudio son Joshua D. Niznik, PharmD, PhD; Jacob N. Hunnicutt, PhD; Xinhua Zhao, PhD; Maria K. Mor, PhD; Florentina Sileanu, MS; Sherrie L. Aspinall, PharmD, MSc; Sydney P. Springer, PharmD, MS; Mary J. Ersek, PhD, RN; Walid F. Gellad, MD, MPH; Loren J. Schleiden, MS; Joseph T. Hanlon, PharmD, MS; Joshua M. Thorpe, PhD, MPH; y Carolyn T. Thorpe, PhD, MPH.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *