Five Things to Know Right Now About Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19)

You may have heard a lot recently about “coronavirus” or COVID-19, the virus responsible for a current global outbreak. Scientists and health experts are still learning more, but here are five things to know to keep yourself and those you care for safe and informed.

1. What is COVID-19?

COVID-19 is a type of coronavirus, which is a family of viruses common in humans and many different animals. Viruses in this family can cause respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases. Cases of COVID-19 in particular can be mild, but others can be more severe and occasionally deadly—especially for those living with other chronic health conditions.

2. Where is it?

Click here for a list of countries impacted by COVID-19.

3. What are the symptoms and what should I do if I experience them?

In general, COVID-19 causes a respiratory illness that ranges from mild to severe, though for some it can be deadly. Symptoms, which usually appear 2 to 14 days after someone gets infected, can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

If you have these symptoms, call your healthcare professional first, before visiting an office. Your healthcare professional will determine if your symptoms match COVID-19 and whether you should be tested. Also contact your healthcare professional if you have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19 and/or have recently traveled to an area where COVID-19 cases have occurred.

If you develop emergency warning signs such as difficulty breathing, call 911 immediately. Let the 911 operator know that you may have COVID-19 symptoms.

4. How does it spread?

Scientists are still learning more, but coronavirus appears to spread person-to-person during close contact with someone infected, specifically from respiratory droplets when that person coughs.

It appears COVID-19 may also be able to spread on household surfaces and in the air, so it’s always best to exercise as much caution as possible while scientists learn more.

5. How can I protect myself and others?

For now, the CDC recommends that older adults or those with chronic medical conditions consider postponing travel, especially to areas impacted by COVID-19.

Additionally, the CDC recommends everyone follow these everyday practices:

  • Stay at home as much as possible and avoid crowds or poorly ventilated areas.
  • Make sure you have access to several weeks of medications and supplies in case you need to stay home for prolonged periods of time.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water (or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol) for at least 20 seconds. Soap up and then sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice before you rinse off the soap. You should especially wash your hands after going to the bathroom; before eating; after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; and after encountering anyone who is or may be sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash. If a tissue isn’t readily available, sneeze or cough into your elbow to reduce the risk of spreading infection with your hands.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning product.

Stay Empowered, Stay Informed

Physical and Mental Exercise Lower Chances for Developing Delirium After Surgery

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

After having surgery, many older adults develop delirium, the medical term for sudden and severe confusion. In fact, between 10 and 67 percent of older adults experience delirium after surgery for non-heart-related issues, while 5 to 61 percent experience delirium after orthopedic surgery (surgery dealing with the bones and muscles).

Delirium can lead to problems with thinking and decision-making. It can also make it difficult to be mobile and perform daily functions and can increase the risk for illness and death. Because adults over age 65 undergo more than 18 million surgeries each year, delirium can have a huge impact personally, as well as for families and our communities.

Healthcare providers can use several tools to reduce the chances older adults will develop delirium. Providers can meet with a geriatrician before surgery, review prescribed medications, and make sure glasses and hearing aids are made available after surgery (since difficulty seeing or hearing can contribute to confusion). However, preventing delirium prior to surgery may be the best way to help older adults avoid it.

A team of researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine designed a study to see whether older adults who are physically active before having surgery had less delirium after surgery. The research team had previously found that people who enjoy activities such as reading, doing puzzles, or playing games experienced lower rates of delirium. The team published new findings on physical activity in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

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During National Women’s Health Week, Honor Your Own Health

National Women’s Health Week (May 13-19, 2018) is a perfect reminder to female healthcare providers to practice what we preach. As caregivers and as women who serve our communities’ health, we all too often focus on the health needs of others before our own. In the immortal words of every flight attendant, “Put on your oxygen mask before assisting others.” Meaning, of course, that if you’re neglecting your own well-being, it will be difficult for you to help your clients and loved ones.

And as we age, it becomes increasingly important to monitor our health. That’s because older women are more likely than men to have chronic health conditions, including arthritis, high blood pressure, and osteoporosis.

Happily, a great deal of what it takes to boost your chances for staying physically and mentally healthy is within your power. Below is what the experts with the American Geriatrics Society’s Health in Aging Foundation recommend.

See your healthcare provider regularly. Even if you feel perfectly healthy, get a check-up at least once a year, or as often as your provider recommends.

Take medications, vitamins, and supplements only as directed. When you visit your provider, bring all the pills and other supplements you take—even those you buy over the counter without a prescription. Your provider should check all of your pills to make sure they’re safe for you, and you should check with her before taking any new medication or supplement.

Let your provider know right away if a medication or supplement seems to be causing a problem or a side effect. Continue reading

Measured with Fitness Trackers, Light Intensity Physical Activity Linked to Lower Mortality in Women 63 to 99

JAGS graphicJournal of the American Geriatrics Society Research Summary

Experts say that a lack of physical activity leads to age-related weakness and poor health in older adults. Official guidelines suggest that healthy older adults spend at least 2.5 hours every week doing moderate activity (such as brisk walking), or at least 1.25 hours per week doing vigorous exercise (such as jogging or running).

Unfortunately, many older adults are not physically able to perform either moderate or vigorous intensity exercise. Researchers created a study to learn more about how much exercise older adults are able to perform, and how that exercise affects their health.

The research team studied 6,489 female participants aged 63 to 99 years old. The researchers published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The participants agreed to take in-home exams, answer health questionnaires, and wear accelerometers (devices similar to fitness trackers). The participants also kept sleep logs.

The study was conducted between 2012 and 2013. The researchers reviewed death certificates as of September 2016 to learn how many participants had died. Continue reading

A Flu Shot is The Best Shot at Prevention for People 65 and Older

cdc-dj-vaccination-clinic_title-2Daniel B. Jernigan, MD, MPH
Director of the Influenza Division
National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

For millions of people, the flu can mean a fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, and fatigue for a week or more. But did you know that if you are 65 years or older, you are at increased risk of serious flu-related complications, like pneumonia?

“People’s immune systems can become weaker with age, which places older adults at high risk of serious flu-related complications,” says Dr. Lisa Grohskopf, a medical officer with CDC’s Influenza Division.

While flu seasons vary in severity, people 65 years and older bear a comparatively greater burden of serious flu-related illness compared to other age groups during most flu seasons. Data from recent seasons shows that between about 70 to 90 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths in the United States have occurred among people 65 years and older. For hospitalizations, this number is between about 50 and 70 percent.

This is why flu vaccination is especially important for people 65 years and older. While flu vaccine can vary in how well it works, there are a lot of scientific data showing that flu vaccination prevents illness and hospitalizations, even among people 65 and older for whom the vaccine may not work as well. A new CDC study published this summer in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases (CID) found that flu vaccination reduced the risk of flu-related hospitalization among people 65 to 74 years by 61%. Vaccinated people 75 and older were similarly protected (57%).

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