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Recent Press Releases

AGS Refutes President Trump’s Claim that Physicians are Over-counting COVID-19 Deaths for Financial Gain, in Solidarity with the CMSS

  • .@AmerGeriatrics stands with the Council of Medical Specialty Societies (@CMSSmed) in condemning Trump’s false claim that physicians are inflating the #COVID19 death toll for financial gain #geriatrics https://bit.ly/31KAohw

New York (Oct. 26, 2020) — With its more than 6,000 members continuing to care for older Americans affected by COVID-19 at the front-line of the nation’s pandemic response, the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today stood in solidarity with the Council of Medical Special Societies (CMSS) in condemning President Trump’s baseless claim that hospitals and physicians are inflating the number of COVID-19 deaths for their own financial gain.

AGS: Equitably Distributing COVID-19 Vaccine Means "Prioritizing Health Workforce, Older Adults" & Avoiding Age as Unfair Criterion

New York (Sept. 3, 2020)—In oral and written testimony delivered today to the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) stressed the importance of prioritizing health professionals and older adults in the distribution of a future COVID-19 vaccine. Delivered in response to an NASEM draft framework for the equitable distribution of coronavirus immunizations, the comments also stressed the importance of ensuring age is never used to exclude someone categorically from care, including prevention for a pandemic as pernicious as COVID-19.

Renowned Geriatrician Dr. Joseph Ouslander to Helm Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

New York (Aug. 14, 2020)—The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today announced that Joseph G. Ouslander, MD, AGSF—a leading figure in geriatrics with decades of experience helming organizations like the AGS, its Health in Aging Foundation, and some of the nation’s most prestigious health institutions—will succeed William B. Applegate, MD, MPH, MACP, AGSF, as editor-in-chief of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society (JAGS). Having already served in editorial leadership for JAGS across nearly three decades, Dr. Ouslander now will pilot one of the leading and only academic journals dedicated to the care we all need as we age, with Dr. Applegate’s tenure closing at the end of 2020. Dr. Applegate will remain active with the journal, serving as editor emeritus.

“Dr. Ouslander was unanimously endorsed for this position by the AGS Board of Directors,” noted AGS President Annie Medina-Walpole, MD, AGSF. “That speaks volumes not only about his prowess, but also about how highly regarded he is among his peers. We’re very fortunate to have Dr. Ouslander leading JAGS as we look to showcase a new decade of innovative research, care models, and education.”

Protecting American Homes from COVID-19 Means “Protecting Home for COVID-19 Data at CDC”: AGS Experts

New York (July 20, 2020)—The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today expressed concern that the new process for sharing COVID-19 data risks fragile progress in our hard-fought national response to the pandemic. The AGS is particularly concerned that the new process, which would change the role of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), does not provide public access to the data at a time when the agency’s impartial expertise has never been needed more.

“Representing more than 6,000 experts who care for us all as we age, the AGS strongly believes the CDC is still best positioned to collect, analyze, and act on health data as we support age-friendly care in the face of pandemics,” notes AGS President Annie Medina-Walpole, MD, AGSF. “Instead of removing the country’s premier health protection agency from the equation, let’s focus on building the infrastructure it needs to remain ‘first among equals’ leading local, state, and other national partners in ending COVID-19.”

Sustained Support for WHO “Vital to Us All as We Age,” Say AGS Experts

New York (July 9, 2020)—The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) today joined organizations across health care, international development, and science in criticizing the Trump Administration’s move to withdraw the U.S. from the World Health Organization (WHO).

“Simply put: The WHO is vital to who we are—and who we can become—as we age,” notes AGS President Annette Medina-Walpole, MD, AGSF. “At a time when so many hard-won victories for creating  age-friendly communities and health are jeopardized by crises like COVID-19, we need to stand indivisible and support international cooperation critical to high-quality, person-centered care for us all.”

As the United Nations agency responsible for public health, the WHO has played a key role in improving health, safety, and independence for us all as we age. Founded after World War II, the WHO employs more than 7,000 workers spread across 150 offices that alert the world to threats, fighting diseases, developing policy, and improving access to care, including for older adults.